Photographing Winter in Maine - Photography by Kirk M. Rogers - With My Cameras in the State of Maine


This photojournal consists of image groups taken in January and February in our Maine winter. And no, it’s not about photographing all aspects of a Maine winter - we live in a large state, but documents the places I visited with my lenses as I was out and about seeking birds or in my travels. Having been raised primarily in the south, I’m not a winter sports person and don’t ski or snowmobile, but I’m always interested in getting out and would comment that if you’re a photographer in Maine there are times when one really does ‘suffer for art’. This winter so far had been quite normal for cold and snowfall, but after the last few years, everyone became a bit spoiled - this winter managed to snap us all back to reality…

Going into 2011 was a bit unusual in that I didn’t have much work travel or field time planned. Other than, Valsartan availability in uk over Thanksgiving - not exactly in wintertime, I’d been in state for most of it. I like to get south for a week or more with my cameras in winter, and although I considered the idea of taking the month of February for field time this year, never put a plan into action. I may yet take a few weeks off before summer in Maine arrives.




View from the Ice - Seven Vertical Exposure Composite

View from the Ice - Thompson Lake, Oxford County
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January 2011...

Bohemian Waxwings - Cumberland, Maine


It has been an unusual winter for birds in our area. One species I’m always on the look-out for is the Wo kann man levitra rezeptfrei kaufen. These can be found mixed in small numbers with Cedar Waxwings at times, but this year brought in entire groups with higher numbers than is normal. A report was posted to the Maine birders list-serve by a friend, Rob Spiers, of a flock of two-hundred plus Bohemians feeding in an apple orchard in Cumberland. I contacted Rob to learn more about this and one chilly Saturday morning Linda and I drove over to see what we could find. Before this morning was done I went from having a mediocre to no archive of Bohemian images to a rather significant group. They are beautiful birds, even more so than Buy celexa uk I believe - which are quite stunning, and well worth the effort to locate if possible. I was in the orchard just over an hour and took over four-hundred exposures on nothing but Bohemian Waxwings. It took a bit of time to figure out their escape flight path and where they were hanging out for imaging opportunities, but once I did, I managed to work my way through the snow behind them, selected an advantageous spot to place and level my tripod and waited. After a time they recognized I didn’t present a threat and were going about their business - eating leftover apples that remained on the trees – before long I had them all around including inside the minimum focus range of my 600mm lens - it was great!


Bohemian Waxwings - Cumberland, Maine

Canon 1Ds Mark III/EF 600mm F/4L + 1.4X, 1/800 second @ f/8, ISO 640 with extended flash.


The Bohemian Waxwing Files...

Bohemian Waxwing - Cumberland, MaineBohemian Waxwing - Cumberland, Maine
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Bohemian Waxwings - Cumberland, Maine
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Bohemian Waxwing - Cumberland, MaineBohemian Waxwing - Cumberland, MaineBohemian Waxwing - Cumberland, Maine
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Bohemian Waxwing - Cumberland, MaineBohemian Waxwing - Cumberland, Maine
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Bohemian Waxwing - Cumberland, MaineBohemian Waxwing - Cumberland, MaineBohemian Waxwing - Cumberland, Maine
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Bohemian Waxwing - Cumberland, Maine
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Bohemian Waxwing - Cumberland, MaineBohemian Waxwing - Cumberland, Maine
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Bohemian Waxwing - Cumberland, Maine
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Our Maine birding community owes Robert and Erin Pierce of Orchard Hill Farm in Cumberland a heartfelt ‘thank-you’ for being so accommodating and allowing birders to observe the flock in and around their orchard. I later stopped by to express my thanks in person and dropped off a few prints. The store they run at their facility is quite nice and Erin offered me a loaf of homemade bread that I learned later was a real treat. I have every intention of being a regular customer and if you live in the area you should be as well…


Bohemian Waxwing - Cumberland, Maine...

Canon EOS 1Ds Mark III, 1/800 second at f/8, ISO 640, EF 600mm + 1.4X with flash
Bohemian Waxwing - Cumberland, Maine
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Northern Pintail - South Portland, Maine


A few days later I crossed the Casco Bay Bridge into South Portland to check out an area where some Northern Pintails had been reported. This is best when timed with high tide, so it put me there in mid-afternoon, the warmest part of the day - but it was far from balmy. The inlet was behind a car wash so I drove in to take a look and found some ducks in residence, including a pair of Buy atorvastatin 20 mg online. The fellow working at the facility was familiar with birders coming around and didn’t seem to mind. However, when I pulled the tripod mounted 600mm lens out of my truck it did garner some attention… I didn’t stay long but didn’t need to. Once I’d taken some insurance shots – the lighting was harsh, beating on the water and quite a challenge, I checked out the downward slope to see if I could get in closer. I’d have to climb over the snow and ice and try not to roll down the cut, but figured it was worth a go. One thing I didn’t expect was these ducks would be skittish – well they were and by the time I got into the wetness of the bottom it spooked everything in the area. There wasn’t much to be done at that point – wait to see if/when they returned or get out of the cold. I climbed out, re-packed and was soon on my way…


Northern Pintail, South Portland, Maine...

Canon 1Ds Mark III/EF 600mm F/4L + 1.4X, 1/400 second @ f/8, ISO 640 with extended flash.


A few Duck Images - January 10th...

Northern PintailNorthern Pintails
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Hooded Mergansers
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Hooded MergansersHooded Mergansers
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While I was photographing the pintails, Corey Hamilton, the Animal Control Officer for the City stopped by and we engaged in conversation. I learned that Corey is a falconer – I knew about this pursuit of course, but didn’t know people in our area practiced this ancient sport. We discussed what raptors were employed in this pursuit and I gathered Corey was always looking for new birds and potential locations to find them. This appears to be a strictly regulated hobby with rigid guidelines to become involved. Corey asked if I’d observed the hybrid Mallard hanging around with the other Mallards at nearby Mill Creek Park. I replied I had not, so we took our vehicles over to learn if the bird were around – which it was…


Mallard Hybrid - South Portland, Maine...

Canon EOS 1Ds Mark III, 1/60 second at f/16, ISO 640, EF 600mm + 1.4X with extended flash
Mallard Hybrid
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Mallard HybridMallard HybridMallard Hybrid
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Mallard Hybrid
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Mallard - South Portland, Maine


Nobody could tell what the other half of this hybrid may be. I noticed the sun peeking through illuminating feathers on Mallard heads as they walked about. I don’t photograph these birds often where they’re so common, but viewed this as a fine opportunity…


Mallard, South Portland, Maine...

Canon 1Ds Mark III/EF 600mm F/4L + 1.4X, 1/320 second @ f/8, ISO 640.


MallardMallard
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Mallard
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Rob Spiers, always the diligent birder, posted a report of white-winged gulls in the Mill Creek area of South Portland. I contacted him and we developed a plan to meet at the site around high tide on Friday January 14th, to learn what we could find.

It had been cold and the water approaches closest to the shoreline were frozen over. This precluded finding much of interest close in. We did observe many gulls at distance, where the water opened up. Rob’s rangefinder estimated this distance as just less than two-hundred yards – a long way distant and there was a lot of haze in the air. However, we were there so I pulled out my tripod and Rob set up his spotting scope to have a look. We were hoping to find Glaucous and Iceland Gulls. The Glaucous would be new to my Bird Photography Index, always a good thing in my estimation.

Many thanks to Eric Hynes of Maine Audubon in Falmouth for checking these image identifications...


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Glaucous Gull
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Glaucous GullGlaucous Gull
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Glaucous Gull
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And Some Iceland Gulls...

Iceland GullIceland Gull
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Iceland Gull
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Herring Gull


We checked the time and decided to look around the Marine Trade Center across the bridge in Portland harbor. This location has potential provided the fishing boats aren’t docked and fueling up, making a good deal of noise. There are multiple piers that go into the harbor and you never know what may be in the area. This day we were fortunate as there was activity reasonably close in. Included in the group were Long-tailed Ducks, Dexamethasone purchase online, Common Eiders, a plethora of Herring and Great-Black backed Gulls and Red-breasted Mergansers. This turned out to be an auspicious stop...


Herring Gull - Portland, Maine...

Canon 1Ds Mark III/EF 600mm F/4L + 1.4X, 1/500 second @ f/10, ISO 640.


Around Portland Harbor...

Around Portland Harbor
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Long-tailed Duck Flight Sequence...

Long-tailed Duck Flight Sequence
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In mid-January a rare bird sighting was made in Brunswick generating a good deal of interest. A Varied Thrush had been hanging around the backyard of Leonard & Elizabeth Andrews. Elizabeth isn’t a birder but she recognized this was something different and made some inquiries, prompting a considerable response. It didn’t take long for this sighting information to travel far and wide and people came from all over Maine and multiple states to check it out. I’d photographed this species a year or two ago in Cape Elizabeth, where one was hanging around in the winter and hoped to have another opportunity. As a courtesy, I emailed Elizabeth to ascertain her agreement with my visit. She had many visitors tramping through her back yard, and some she even had in the house to observe the bird through her back-deck sliders. She invited us in to do the same, but I indicated there were several reasons why I couldn’t (or wouldn’t) attempt a photograph through a sliding door. On Saturday morning, January 15th, Linda and I found the spot and I set up my 600mm system. There was one significant issue – it was bitterly cold… at 0800 hours it was minus two degrees and not expected to warm much. Plus if the wind came through it was indeed a challenge. This had the advantage of fewer people around the yard – many wouldn’t venture out in these temperatures, but there were a few hardy souls who stopped by...


Varied Thrush - Brunswick, Maine...

Canon EOS 1Ds Mark III, 1/250 second at f/8, ISO 800, EF 600mm + 1.4X with extended flash
Varied Thrush
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I moved the tripod back behind some trees for cover but remained standing in the snow. The bird stayed in the area a good bit of the time, but I never had an opportunity to take an exposure when it broke cover. As most subjects of this nature do, it stayed protected in the trees, often perched in one spot in cover. From a birder's perspective this is fine – they can observe the subject, ascertain an identification, and add it to their life-list or whatever, but for a photographer it’s the shot that makes the difference. It was only a matter of minutes before the cold was overwhelming the way I was dressed standing still in the snow. I wanted to stay longer, so gave Linda the keys and told her go back to the vehicle to stay warm. I use my Mark III 1Ds camera in the cold often – there’s little choice weather-wise unless you only shoot interiors in Maine. However, I have never observed this camera go frost white until this morning, generating a concern for the electronics. Whenever I placed my eye in the viewfinder any part of my clothing that touched the camera stuck there. What turned out to be even more of a nuisance was the need to hold my breath whenever I approached the viewfinder to expose a sequence. If I exhaled near the camera if would instantly and totally fog up the viewfinder and LCD screen to the point I could not focus or compose an image.

Varied ThrushVaried Thrush
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Varied Thrush


I was pleased to have observed the thrush and afterwards Linda and I spent some time in the house speaking with Elizabeth. I had few unobstructed images after review on the computer and was hoping to pick a better day, hopefully with not too many people around to try again. While waiting I photographed some other backyard birds and was particularly pleased to see Where to buy diclofenac sodium, which we don’t get often around our yard. Others in the template below include the Dark-eyed Junco, American Goldfinch and Black-capped Chickadee


Varied Thrush - Brunswick, Maine...

Canon 1Ds Mark III/EF 600mm F/4L + 1.4X, 1/500 second @ f/7.1, ISO 800 with extended flash.

Elizabeth's Yard Birds
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Varied Thrush Revisited - Brunswick, Maine...

The Following Monday, January 17th, was Martin Luther King Day. After evaluating the thrush image group I knew that I didn’t have the shot I was seeking – yes, I'd have to try again. And why wait… The bird was still reported in the area and Elizabeth indicated between 0900 and 1000 hours he was generally around. This time I packed all my cold weather gear and was prepared to stay as long as was necessary. As it turned out, it was balmy eight degrees this morning but I can state unequivocally, this did make a difference. It was cold but not unbearable. I set up in the same location as the few days before, but this time I dropped the tripod and sat or kneeled in the snow. Once I took a few test shots to get the exposure compensation and shutter speed adjusted I was ready. I guess you can say that today was my day – the Varied Thrush flew in almost immediately and remained in the open as I shot multiple frames. Some of the best images of the morning were taken in first ten minutes of so. I was pleased with the images from this morning and will post some here…


Varied Thrush - Brunswick, Maine...

Canon EOS 1Ds Mark III, 1/250 second at f/18, ISO 1000, EF 600mm + 1.4X with extended flash
Varied Thrush
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Varied Thrush Views
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Common Redpolls
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Red SquirrelBlack-capped Chickadee
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J Dwight Filling the Feeders, Wilton, Maine


On January 20th, J. Dwight in Wilton posted to the list-serve that he’d had regular Hoary Redpoll sightings at his place in Wilton. I contacted J and made arrangements to make the drive to his home two days later, a Saturday. This turned out to be an interesting trip in multiple regards as during the day we discussed various topics. I’ve done a significant amount of photography in the Savannah National Wildlife Refuge in Georgia and South Carolina, and know this facility better than any other I frequent with my cameras. As we talked about these endeavors J asked if I’d ever been to Wassaw Island, a part of the Savannah Coastal Islands NW Refuge. I replied I had and felt privileged to have been allowed on the island - not many have the opportunity. This island was owned by a Maine family since the American Civil War era and later it was deeded over to the refuge. However, the family retained a compound on the island consisting of four homes, the only private residences on Wassaw. I was amazed when J indicated it was his family that had turned over the island to the refuge. I knew the history somewhat but it never occurred to me I’d ever meet one of the Mainers involved with this… After this discovery it was like old home week as we knew many of the same people and places on Wassaw Island. J invited me to meet them in Savannah sometime when they plan to visit – an invitation I may just take him up on if the opportunity presents. I could already view in my mind’s eye what possibilities awaited getting to the island for multiple days and nights. My website, Writings and Articles section has multiple photojournals posted from my endeavors in this facility should anyone care to learn more. SNWR and the staff employed there has made this facility dear to me.

Oh, and yes – we located a Hoary Redpoll to add to my Bird Photography Index…


J Dwight, Wilton, Maine...

Canon 5d/EF 400mm F/5.6L, 1/640 second @ f/9, ISO 640.


J had a good deal of activity around his yard included a Sharp-shinned Hawk that showed up from time to time, although I had no chance for an exposure. I concentrated on following the Hoary Redpolls mixed in with flock coming and going, aptly spotted by J while my eye remained in the viewfinder. All together I had a large archive from the two hours or so we stayed out in the cold. Later at the computer evaluating the images it occurred to me what a character this bird was – quite a personality. Other birds I photographed included many species one would expect to find – Common Redpolls, Black-capped Chickadees, a Hairy Woodpecker, Red-breasted Nuthatch and a group of Rock Doves that was flying around occasionally. It was a good morning…


Hoary Redpoll - Wilton, Maine...

Canon EOS 1Ds Mark III, 1/250 second at f/18, ISO 1000, EF 600mm + 1.4X with extended flash
Hoary Redpoll
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The Hoary Redpoll Files...

Hoary Redpoll Files
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A Few of J's Yardbirds - Wilton, Maine...

J's Yardbirds - Wilton, Maine
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There’s one last image group from January to be added here. Rob Spiers had located some Horned Larks around Seavey Landing in Scarborough and taken a few exposures. I have a few, not really usable shots of this species taken at distance in Colorado, and was intrigued to learn we had some locally. I contacted Rob and, always the gentleman, he indicated we should meet and try to re-locate the flock. So we planned to meet mid-day on a Monday for a quick in and out session. Again this would be best at high tide but in this case it could not be accommodated. We met on Route 1 in Scarborough and I followed Rob to the site. Before we left only one Horned Lark was spotted - it flew by us like it had just escaped Hades - this was our only lark sighting.


Rob Spiers Walking the Shoreline - Scarborough, Maine...

Canon EOS 1Ds Mark III, 1/320 second at f/8, ISO 400, EF 600mm + 1.4X with extended flash
Rob Spiers
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Common Goldeneye Flyby


It was a cold day exacerbated by a twenty-knot wind blowing across the water. One thing is certain about our Maine winter – if you’re out doing things of this nature you must really want to because it can get miserable quick. I’m generally good for up to four hours or so depending, but this was a shorter session and the first time this year I went out to seek a particular species unsuccessfully. This doesn’t mean there wasn’t plenty of other activity around though. There was a strong haze in the air – I could see it through the long lens but didn’t realize how intense this was until later at the computer. I deleted many shots as unusable because of this, including a series of Bufflehead images. We also quickly realized this was a good spot for birds flying into Scarborough Marsh, so I took some exposures on whatever came by as the wind buffeted my lens. Other sightings included American Black Ducks, Mallards, Common Goldeneye, Canada Goose, an immature and adult Bald Eagle and the usual Herring Gulls.


Common Goldeneye Flyby - Scarborough, Maine...

Canon EOS 1Ds Mark III, 1/1000 second at f/8, ISO 400, EF 600mm + 1.4X = 840mm


Views Around Seavey Landing - Scarborough, Maine...

Views Around Seavey Landing
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This concluded my field time for January as the month ended. However, I felt like I was on a roll and wished to get out with my cameras whenever I could as February commenced...




Link to Page Two



Kiro
March 2011





A note about the photography...All images in this account are by the author. Any images viewed that are digitally framed and labeled have been added to my collection of works for sale. These are displayed when at shows and events either packaged on foam core, professionally framed or ArtiPlaq™ mounted as a final for purchase. The web versions are nice, but a full resolution print significantly enhances the beauty of these images; all are ©2011 Photography by Kirk M. Rogers - any reproduction, publication or transmission of this content without the written consent of the author is prohibited. Please contact me should you have an interest in obtaining any of the images.



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